I’m not bad. I’m just drawn that way.

Eddie Valiant: You don’t know how hard it is being a man looking at a woman looking the way you do.
Jessica Rabbit: I’m not bad. I’m just drawn that way

Jessica Rabbit – Roger’s smoking hot wife in ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ – so sensual that even though just a cartoon, men could not resist her.

So what did Jessica Rabbit mean when she said ‘drawn that way’? She’s talking about her wondrous curves of course, which for us in the real world may be the way God made us, the result of genes, exercise and diet (or lack of) or for the really cynical: a plastic surgeon. Regardless though, the minute a woman has a full and curvy body, she is secretly drooled over by men, and envied by other women. However those same men and women will judge her to be a bad person who exists only to tempt innocent men away from their wives and girlfriends. If anyone saw the film ‘He’s Just Not That Into You’, you’ll recall that Scarlett Johansson was typecast as the ‘other woman’. You don’t see skinny Jennifer Connelly playing that role! No… people look at Scarlett, and see sex. And Angelina – the woman that everybody loves to hate – accused of stealing Brad Pitt. Well, in all honesty, HE was the one who had made a promise and HE broke it. It had nothing to do with her, yet everyone is so quick to judge.

The lot of the ‘endowed’ women is not easy. Clothes are not designed for curves, models are clotheshorses: in many cases they might as well have just used a floating hanger. High necks and loose fits make a curvy woman look like a frumpy sack of potatoes. You can’t hate someone for wanting to look good, and if that means lower necks and tighter fits, then so be it! East London is full of ‘indies’ or ‘hipsters’ who have somehow made the androgynous look cool. Thin girls and weedy boys will often be spotted out wearing identical outfits: uncomfortably skinny jeans and a buttoned up checked shirt… not a look that sits well on a man who’s ripped or a girl with thighs or breasts. So in order to not be judged by both men and women it seems that a girl has 2 choices:

1) Starve herself until she is skeletal enough to look ‘good’ in covered clothes that are 5 sizes too big for her OR thin enough that even if she did wear leggings and low cuts, rather than objectifying her body people would be entirely preoccupied with which anorexia clinic to send her off to.

2) Cover up.

I suppose my point is that just because a woman has a great figure and isn’t afraid to show that off, doesn’t mean she’s bad… she’s just drawn that way!

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5 thoughts on “I’m not bad. I’m just drawn that way.

  1. After an unfortunate incident where a group of female friends sort of turned on me and basically blamed me for what happened I have been searching for matronly outfits that will hide my body so that people won’t think I’m so “bad”. This really made my night. One could say I’m a miniature version of Christina Hendrick’s (spelling?) body type. And I’m tired of looking frumpy. I always have cleavage no matter what I do. I’m tired of hiding and I shouldn’t be ashamed of my body any more. Thank you for this post!

  2. I went through a situation a while back that was rather unfortunate and a group of women that I really trusted sort of turned on me and basically blamed me for the situation. It really hurt (even after a year) and I have blamed myself because I am a curvy girl (you could say I’m a miniature version of Christina Hendrick’s body type). I don’t try to show off my curves but most everything I wear will show cleavage. After the incident I mentioned above, I started shopping for long skirts and turtle necks, anything that would make me look matronly so people wouldn’t think I was “bad”. This post really made my night. Thank you! I should stop being ashamed of my body.

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